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Where did the word veteran come from?

Where did the word veteran come from?

A veteran (from Latin vetus ‘old’) is a person who has significant experience (and is usually adept and esteemed) and expertise in a particular occupation or field. A military veteran is a person who is no longer serving in a military.

When was the word veteran invented?

Veteran is a relative veteran in the English language. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) first attests it in 1509, when, much as now, the word named an old or experienced soldier.

What does it mean to be called a veteran?

The term “veteran” means a person who served in the active military, naval, or air service, and who was discharged or released therefrom under conditions other than dishonorable.

What is short for veteran?

The noun vet is short for either veteran (of the Armed Forces) or veterinarian (animal doctor).

Are you a veteran if you never deployed?

1, 1947, are considered veterans of the United States. People who just serve in the National Guard and Reserve without a federal deployment are usually not eligible for veterans benefits, unless they were injured during their basic or advanced training or while on weekend drill or the two-week summer training.

How many years do you have to serve to be a veteran?

20 years
Now, under the new law, anyone eligible for reserve component retirement benefits is considered a veteran, said Krenz. “Anyone who has reached 20 years of service, even if they were never activated on a [federal] order for more than 180 days outside of training, will now be considered a veteran,” he said.

What are examples of veteran?

An example of a veteran is someone who served in the army. A person who has worked for 20 years in the field of social work is an example of someone who would be described as a veteran in the field. A person who has served in the armed forces, especially an old soldier who has seen long service.

Are you a veteran if you were never deployed?

Now, under the new law, anyone eligible for reserve component retirement benefits is considered a veteran, said Krenz. “Anyone who has reached 20 years of service, even if they were never activated on a [federal] order for more than 180 days outside of training, will now be considered a veteran,” he said.